Bryn Mawr Classical Review 04.03.17


BOOKS RECEIVED (Long form with tables of contents: July 1993)


  • Annas, Julia, Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, vol. X. Oxford: 1992. Pp. 293. ISBN-0-19-824047-3.

    Craft and Fineness in Plato's Ion (Christopher Janaway) 1

    Plato's Cratylus: The Naming of Nature and the Nature of Naming (Allan Silverman) 25

    Plato's "Refutation" of Protagorean Relativism: Theaetetus 170-171 (Richard J. Ketchum) 73

    Tragedy and Self-Sufficiency: Plato and Aristotle on Fear and Pity (Martha Nussbaum) 107

    The Cyrenaic Theory of Knowledge (Voula Tsouna McKirahan) 161

    "What all men believe -- must be true": Common Conceptions and consensio omnium in Aristotle and Hellenistic Philosophy (Dirk Obbink) 193

    White on Aristotelian Happiness (Roger Crisp) 233

    Socratic Puzzles: A Review of Gregory Vlastos, Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher (T.H. Irwin) 241

    Metacommentary (Jonathan Barnes) 267

    Index Locorum 283


  • Carey, Christopher (ed.), Apollodoros Against Neaira. Warminster: Aris & Phillips Ltd., 1992. Pp. 164. $19.95. ISBN-0-85668-526-7.

    Preface vii

    Abbreviations viii

    Introduction

    1. Dramatis personae 1

    2. Date 3

    3. The law 3

    4. The hidden agenda 4

    5. Apollodoros' case 8

    6. The speech 12

    7. Women in Athens 15

    8. Authorship and style 17

    9. The documents 20

    10. The text 20

    Text and translation 30

    Commentary 84

    Appendix 152

    Index 158


  • Edwards, Catharine, The Politics of Immorality in Ancient Rome. Cambridge: Cambridge Univeristy Press, 1993. $54.95. ISBN-0-512-40083-X.

    Introduction 1

    1. A moral revolution? The law against adultery 34

    2. Mollitia: reading the body 63

    3. Playing Romans: representations of actors and the theatre 98

    4. Structures of immorality: rhetoric, building and socialhierarchy 137

    5. Prodigal pleasures 173

    Bibliography 207

    Index locorum 221

    Index of subjects and proper names 225


  • Gaisser, Julia Haig, Catullus and HIs Renaissance Readers. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Pp. 446. $75.00. ISBN-0-19-814882-8.

    Illustrations x

    Abbreviations xi

    Selective Chronology xii

    Introduction: Fortuna Catulli 1

    1. Emendatio: from the Editio Princeps to the First Aldine 24

    2. Interpretatio: making sense of Catullus 66

    3. Praelectio: Pierio Valeriano at the University of Rome 109

    4. Commentarius: Marc-Antoine de Muret, Achilles Statuis, and Joseph Scaliger 146

    5. Imitatio: Catullan poetry from Martial to Johannes Secundus 193

    6. Parodia: Catullus and the Res Publica Litterarum 255

    Conclusion: the Renaissance Catullus 272

    Notes 275

    Appendices 401

    Bibliography 416

    Index Locorum 433

    General Index 439


  • Gowers, Emily, The Loaded Table. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993. Pp. 334. $65.00. ISBN-0-19-814695-7.

    Abbreviations x

    1. An Approach to Eating 1

    2. barbarian Spinach and Roman Bacon: The Comedies of Plautus 50

    3. Black Pudding: Roman Satire 109

       Introduction 109

        Horace 126

       Persius 180

       Juvenal 188

    4. A Taste of Things to Come: Invitation Poems 220

        Introduction 220

        Catullus 13 229

        Martial 245

        Pliny, Epistle 1.15 267

    5. Garlic Breath: Horace, Epode 3 280

    References 311

    Index 325


  • Gruzelier, Claire, Claudian. De Raptu Proserpinae. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Pp. 309. $65.00. ISBN-0-19-814777-5.

    Abbreviations xi

    Introduction xvii

    Sigla 1

    Text and Translation 2

    Commentary 79

    Further Bibliography 302

    Index Verborum 303

    Index Rerum et Nominum 305


  • Hainsworth, Bryan, The Iliad: A Commentary: books 9-12. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Pp. 380. ISBN-0-512-23711-4.

    Abbreviations xv

    Introduction

    1. Formulas 1

    i. Hapax legomena 6

    ii. localization 7

    iii. Phrase Patterns 9

    iv. Sentence patterns 10

    v. Minimal statements 12

    vi. Synonyms 13

    vii. Substitution 15

    viii. Formulas proper 16

    ix. Types of formula 18

    x. Whole-line formulas, couplets, and runs 19

    xi. Ornamental epithets 21

    xii. Special and generic epithets 22

    xiii Extension 23

    xiv Economy 24

    xv Modification, etc. 26

    xvi. Clustering 27

    xvii. Conservatism and replacement 28

    2. The Iliad as heroic poetry 32

    i. The verse and the singer 34

    ii. The tradition 38

    iii. The hero 44

    a) Exemplary Character 45

    b) Status 45

    c) Force and will 47

    d) Egotism and A)EIKE/A E)/RGA 49

    iv. The Greek tradition and the Iliad 50

    Commentary 55

    Index 367


  • Halliwell, S. (trans.), Plato Republic V. Warminster: Aris & Phillips Ltd., 1993. Pp. 228. $24.95. ISBN-0-85668-536-4.

    Preface vii

    Abbreviations & References ix

    Introduction 1

    1.1 Design & Discovery: Approaching Bk. 5 1

    1.2 The Structure of Argument in Bk. 5 3

    1.3 The Status of the Arguments in bk. 5 5

    2. Nature, Individuals and Society 7

    2.1 Plato's Female Guardians 9

    2.2 Eugenics and Kinship 16

    3. War, Greeks and Barbarians 21

    4. Philosophy, Knowledge and Value 25

    Notes to the Introduction 31

    Bibliography 36

    Note on the Text and Translation 39

    Text and Translation 41

    Apparatus Criticus 130

    Commentary 131

    Appendix: Republic 5 and Aristophanes' Ecclesiazusae 224

    Index 227


  • Halpern, Baruch & Hobson, Deborah W. (edd.), Law, Politics and Society in the Ancient Mediterranean World. Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 1993. Pp. 291. $70.00. ISBN 1-85075-350-4.

    Abbreviations 7

    Introduction 9

    Reuven Yaron: "Social Problems and Policies in the Ancient Near East" 19

    Maynard P. Maidman: "Some Late Bronze Age Legal Tablets from the British Museum: Problems of Context and Meaning" 42

    Robert R. Wilson: "The Role of Law in Early Israelite Society" 90

    Virginia J. Hunter: "Agnatic Kinship in Athenian Law and Athenian Family Practice: Its Implications for Women" 100

    Marguerite Deslauriers: "Some implications of Aristotle's conception of authority" 122

    Paul R. Swarney: "Social Status and Social Behaviour as Criteria in Judicial Proceedings in the Late Republic" 137

    Jonathan Edmondson: "Instrumenta Imperii: Law and imperialism in Republican Rome" 156

    Deborah W. Hobson: "The Impact of Law on Village Life in Roman Egypt" 193

    Roger S. Bagnall: "Slavery and Society in Late Roman Egypt" 220

    Patrick T.R. Gray: "Palestine and Justinian's Legislation on Non-Christian Religions" 241

    Martin I. Lockshin: "Truth or peshat? Issues in Law and Exegesis" 271

    Index of References 280

    Index of Authors 288


  • Heckel, Waldemar, The Marshals of Alexander's Empire. London and New York: Routledge, 1992. Pp. 416. ISBN-0-415-05053-7.

    List of Abbreviations xiii

    List of Maps xx

    Preface xxi

    Part I

    i: The 'Old Guard' 3

    ii: The 'New Men' 57

    iii: Casualties of the Succession 164

    iv: The So-called 'Boyhood Friends' of Alexander 205

    Part II

    v: The Somatophylakes 237

    A. Career Progress 237

    B. The Careers of the Somatophylakes 259

    C. Pages and Royal Hypaspists 289

    vi: Commanders of Regular Hypaspists 299

    vii: Commanders of the Argyraspids 307

    viii: Commanders of Infantry 320

    ix: Commanders of Cavalry 344

    Appendices

    I. Hephaistion's Chiliarchy 366

    II. The father of Leonnatos 366

    III. The battle of Amorgos 371

    IV. Artakoana 373

    V. The marriage of Attalos and Atalante 381

    VI. Asandros son of Philotas 385

    General Bibliography 387

    Concordance 413


  • Hill, D.E. (ed.), Ovid Metamorphoses V-VIII. Warminster: Aris & Philllips Ltd., 1992. Pp. 248. $24.95. ISBN-0-85668-395-7.

    Preface vii

    Introduction 1

    Metamorphoses

    Book V 10

    Book VI 38

    Book VII 68

    Book VIII 104

    Commentary 141

    Bibliography 239

    Index 245


  • Holst-Warhaft, Gail, Dangerous Voices: Women's Laments and Greek Literature. London and New York: Routledge, 1992. Pp. 227. ISBN-0-415-07249-2.

    A note on transliteration and translation x

    Introduction 1

    Death, tears and ideas: lament in cross-cultural perspective 14

    The painful art: women's laments for the dead in rural Greece 40

    The politics of revenge in the laments of Inner Mani: duty, honour and poisoned eggs 75

    Mourning in a man's world: the Epitaphios Logos and the banning of laments in fifth-century Athens 98

    From the Erinyes to the Eumenides: tragedy and the taming of lament 127

    Epitaphs and photographs: laments in modern Greek literature 171

    Notes 195

    Bibliography 215

    Index 222


  • MacMullen, Ramsay, Enemies of the Roman Order. London and New York: Routledge, 1993. Pp. 370. $17.95. ISBN-0-415-08621-3.

    I. Cato, Brutus, and Their Succession 1

    II. Philosophers 46

    III. Magicians 95

    IV. Astrologers, diviners, and Prophets 128

    V. Urban Unrest 163

    VI. The Outsiders 192

    VII. Conclusion 242

    Appendix A. Famines 249

    Appendix B. Brigandage 255

    Bibliography 269

    Abbreviations 293

    Notes 295

    Index 367


  • Pleiner, Radomir, The Celtic Sword. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Pp. 191. $95.00. ISBN-0-19-813411-8.

    Introduction 1

    1. The Origin of the Celtic long sword in early Europe 4

    The Birth of the sword 5

    The origin of the long sword 6

    The sword and combat in Homer 10

    Changes in warfare in southern Europe 11

    The genesis of the Celtic sword 13

    2. Styles of combat among the Celts 19

    The written evidence and its value 19

    The nature of continental Celtic warfare during the great invasions 24

    Single combat and the survival of Archaic customs in fighting 28

    The Celtic long sword as seen by the Classical world 33

    The later role of the sword in society 35

    3. Notes on the archaeology of the Celtic sword 38

    Sword graves in cemeteries 39

    The problem of Chieftains' graves 42

    Mass deposits 59

    4. The Characteristics of the Celtic sword 61

    The long sword 61

    Punchmarks 64

    Scabbards 65

    The anthropoid short sword 69

    Rapiers 69

    5. How the long sword was made 71

    The starting point 71

    Forging trials 73

    Making flat blade A 75

    Making blade B, with midrib 76

    Fitting a hilt 77

    6. Metallographic examinations of swords from Czechoslovakia 78

    The finds 78

    Methods of investigation 80

    Results of investigations 81

    7. Metallographic examinations of other La Tne period swords from Europe and the British isles 99

    The finds and methods of investigation 100

    Investigation results 104

    8. Techniques of sword manufacture 134

    The manufacture of sword blades 134

    Group A: swords made of wrought iron 140

    Group B: swords with medium or hard steel edges 143

    Hardening 151

    Surface finishing 152

    Hilts 153

    The manufacture of scabbards 154

    8. Battleworthiness 157

    Criticism in ancient sources 157

    Notches on blades 159

    Practical testing 163

    Summary and Conclusions 165

    Bibliography 170

    Glossary of technical terms 182

    Topographical index 187

    Subject index 191


  • Porter, William M., Reading the Classics and Paradise Lost. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1993. Pp. 222. ISBN-0-8032-3706-5.

    Introduction 1

    1. Nec plura adludens: Allusion 13

    The difficulty of attempting to isolate literary allusions 13

    Lesser forms of literary intertexuality 21

    The critical allusion 32

    Allusion as enthymeme 35

    2. Descende caelo: thought 43

    "Above the Aonian Mount" 44

    Hesiod's titanomachy 53

    Horace's "Descende caelo" 67

    The playfulness of the Miltonic critique 80

    3. Facilis descensus Auerno: design 83

    Homer and Vergil 83

    "A poem in twelve books" 94

    The Aeneid inside out 97

    The Aeneid in a mirror 105

    "... imperium Oceano, famam qui terminet astris ..." 116

    "Tantaene animis caelestibus irae?" 119

    4. Quantum mutatus: language 129

    Allusion and translation 129

    Dobson's Paradisus Amissus 136

    "Quantum mutatus ab illo" 140

    Sannazaro, imitation, and allusion 153

    Translation in reverse 167

    Appendix 171

    Notes 179

    Works cited 207

    Index 219


  • Potter, T.W. and Johns, Catherine, Roman Britain. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992. Pp. 239. $35.00. ISBN-0-520-08168-4.

    Introduction 7

    1. Britain before AD 43 12

    2. Conquest and occupation 38

    3. The Romanisation of town and Country 66

    4. Architecture and art 99

    5. Personal possessions 123

    6. Pagan gods and goddesses 158

    7. The fourth century and beyond 185

    Gazetteer of sites to visit 218

    Notes 221

    Bibliography 228

    Photographic acknowledgements 232

    Index 233


  • Richardson, Nicholas, The Iliad: A Commentary, vol. VI: books 21-24. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993. Pp. 387. ISBN-0-512-30960-3.

    Abbreviations xiv

    Introduction

    1. Structure and themes 1

    i. Structure 1

    ii. Themes 14

    2. Two special problems 20

    i. Book division 20

    ii. The end of the Iliad in relation to the Odyssey 21

    3. Homer and his ancient critics 25

    i. From Homer to Aristotle 25

    ii. The Hellenistic period 35

    iii. Rome (to the Augustan period) 40

    iv. Later Greek criticism 43

    v. Neoplatonists and Christians 46

    Commentary 51

    General index to volume VI 363

    Index of Greek words for all volumes 369


  • Segal, Charles, Oedipus Tyrannus: Tragic Heroism and the Limits of Knowledge. New York: Twayne Publishers, 1993. Pp. 183. $22.95. ISBN-0-8057-7979-5.

    Illustrations vii

    Note on the References and Acknowledgments viii

    Chronology xi

    Literary and Historical Context

    1. Historical and Cultural Background 3

    2. Why read Oedipus Tyrannus? 12

    3. Reception and Influence 16

    4. Performance, Theater, and Social Context 36

    5. The Oedipus Myth and Its Interpretation 44

    6. Oedipus and the Trials of the Hero 70

    7. Life's Tragic Shape: Plot, Design, and Destiny 75

    A Reading

    8. The Crisis of the city and the king 97

    9. Discovery and reversal 114

    10. Resolution: tragic suffering, heroic endurance 134

    11. Inner vision and theatrical spectacle 148

    Notes 159

    Selected bibliography 167

    Index 175


  • Sherwin-White, Susan and Kuhr, Amelie, From Samarkhand to Sardis. Berkeley: 1993. Pp. 270, 29 Plates & 11 Maps. $40.00. ISBN-0-520-08183-8.

    List of Illustrations vii

    Preface ix

    Introduction 1

    1. Building the Seleucid Empire 7

    2. The Seleucid Empire in the Third Century 40

    3. The Seleucid Empire in Iran and South-West Central Asia 72

    4. The Eastern Frontiers and Beyond 91

    5. Kings and Kingship 114

    6. Colonialism and Imperialism: aspects of the problem of 'hellenisation' and Greek interactions with non-Greek civilisations in the Seleucid empire 141

    7. Antiochus III: imperialist and warrior 188

    8. The Disintegration of the Seleucid Empire 217

    Chronology of Seleucid and Parthian Kings 230

    The Seleucid Family in the Third Century 231

    Abbreviations 232

    Bibliography 235

    Index of Texts and Documents 250

    General Index 251


  • Slonczewski, Joan, Daughter of Elysium. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1993. Pp. 521. $25.00. ISBN-0-688-12509-3.

    I. The Snake

    II. The Child

    III. The Dance of Fire

    IV. The Immortals


  • Svenbro, Jesper, Phrasikleia: an anthropology of reading in ancient Greece. Translated from 1988 French edition by Janet Lloyd. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993. Pp. 233. $12.95. ISBN-0-8014-9752-3.

    Foreword by Gregory Nagy ix

    Translations consulted xiii

    Introduction 1

    1. Phrasikleia: from silence to sound 8

    2. I write, therefore I efface myself: the speech-act in the earliest greek inscriptions 26

    3. The reader and the reading voice: the instrumental status of reading aloud 44

    4. The child as signifier: the "inscription" of the proper name 64

    5. The writer's daughter: Kallirhoe and the thirty suitors 80

    6. Nomos, "Exegesis," reading: the reading voice and the law 109

    7. True metempsychosis: Lycurgus, Numa, and the tattooed corpse of Epimenides 123

    8. Death by writing: Sappho, the poem, and the reader 145

    9. The inner voice: on the invention of silent reading 160

    10. The reader and the eromenos: the pederastic paradigm of writing 187

    Index 217


  • Taplin, Oliver, Comic Angels. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Pp. 129. $62.00. ISBN 0-19-814797-X.

    Select Bibliography ix

    1. Athens 1

    2. Megale Hellas 12

    3. Tragedy and Iconography 21

    4. Comedy and Iconography 30

    5. Phylakes 48

    6. Comic and Tragic Angels 55

    7. Metatheatrical Players 67

    8. Paratragedy and Paraiconography 79

    9. The Transplantation of Athenian Comedy 89

    Appendix 1. The Getty Birds 101

    Appendix 2. Possible Metatheatrical Pipers in Comedy 105

    Catalogue of Illustrations 111

    General Index 121

    Index of More Important Passages 126

    Index of Chief Theatre-Related Vases Discussed 128


  • Tuplin, Christopher, The Failings of Empire. Stuttgart: Steiner, 1993. Pp. 264. ISBN 3-515-05912-1.

    Preface 5

    Abbreviations 9

    1. Introduction 11

    2. Athens, Asia Minor and the Outbreak of the Corinthian War 43

    3. The Corinthian War 65

    4. The Consolidation of Spartan Power 87

    5. After the Cadmeia I: Friendship and Tyranny 101

    6. After the Cadmeia II: Sparta 125

    7. After the Cadmeia III: Thebes and Athens 147

    8. Conclusions 163

    Endnotes 167

    Appendices I-VII 189

    Bibliography 217

    Indices 238


  • Versnel, H.S., Inconsistencies in Greek & Roman Religion 2: Transition and Reversal in Myth and Ritual. Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1993. Pp. 354. ISBN 90-04-09267-6.

    Preface xi

    Abbreviations xiii

    Introduction 1

    I. What is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander: myth and ritual, old and new

    1. Questions 16

    2. The rise and growth of myth and ritual theory 20

    3. The fuses blow: out and out myth and ritual theorists 37

    4. Criticism 41

    5. Initiation, a modern complex 48

    6. Eppure si muove...: myth and ritual pari passu 74

    7. Prospects 79

    II. Kronos and the Kronia

    1. Myth 90

    2. Ritual 99

    3. Contradictions 106

    4. The festival of reversal 115

    5. The ambiguity of the Kronia and related festivals 122

    6. The king of a primeval reversed world 129

    7. Conclusions 132

    III. Saturnus and the Saturnalia

    1. The evidence 136

    2. Saturnian myth and ritual: the carnivalesque signs of the reversed order 150

    3. Looking back: origins 164

    4. Looking forward: the continuing story of myth and ritual 190

    IV. The Roman festival for Bona Dea and the Greek Thesmophoria

    1. The festival of bona Dea 229

    2. The Thesmophoria 235

    3. Back to Bona Dea 261

    4. Two festivals, one paradox 274

    5. Gune-Parthenos: on the fatal ambiguity of the female race 276

    6. Conclusion 284

    V. Apollo and Mars one hundred years after Roscher

    1. Comparing two gods: Roscher and after 290

    2. Comparing two gods: a structuralist view 296

    3. The social roots of a structural analogy 313

    4. Kindred functions, different imges 328

    bibliography 335

    Indexes 345


  • Wilkins, John (ed.), Heraclidae. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993. Pp. 198. $49.95. ISBN 0-19-814758-9.

    List of Abbreviations and Editions viii

    Introduction xi

    The myth xi

    Literary sources for the flight of the Heraclidae to Athens xiv

    The Heraclidae of Aeschylus xviii

    Innovations by Euripides? xix

    The action of the play and the characters xx

    The religious and social context xxii

    The integrity of the play xxvii

    Heraclidae in art xxxi

    The date of the play xxxiii

    The text xxxv

    Sigla xxxvii

    Text 1

    Commentary 45

    Index 197